Author Topic: Buying my first DIY NAS  (Read 16004 times)

Offline Kega

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Buying my first DIY NAS
« on: February 08, 2013, 02:20:01 pm »
Hello.

I'm trying to build my own NAS, have looked at QNAP and the likes but always found them to slow for what I like to use them for.

I would like to run
  • Plex
  • SAB
  • Stream to my XBMC box
  • Flexraid ;)
  • Windows 7

I'm trying to get power, while still having a low electrical bill :)

So (The following links are for the readers convince as I live in Denmark and won't be using newegg) :
CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K
Ram: Kingston HyperX 16GB
HDD: Western Digital Red WD30EFRX 3TB

That was the main stuff I'm pretty positive should be there.

The stuff that I'm unsure of is the motherboard. I would like room for expanding my HDD Pool as I need to.
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z77M-D3H
I just think 6 slots might not be enough, that's 4 DRU's and 2 PPU's

Case: Fractal Design Define R4
Just unsure if 8 bays is enough, but if I pick the above motherboard it would be - unless you guys have a better alternative? :)

I'm open for suggestions :)
I'm thinking of getting this as soon as possible, as I need to get a HDD for my main machine anyway (one just died).
Crossing my fingers to hear from you guys/girls soon.

Thanks in advance

Offline Foobar

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2013, 03:15:47 pm »
Have you looked at something like the HP Microservers?  Extremely low power usage, perfect for a NAS / flexRAID box.

My N40L has 6 HDD's in it (5 mechanical, 1 SSD for boot) and is currently using a massive 28W :)  I'll spin up all the drives and ... 57W.

Offline Kega

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2013, 03:52:16 pm »
First thing, thanks for the answer :)

Hmm.. I can only find it with room for 4 disks. And a co-worker told me that his I7 machine is running 18W in idle - don't know if that's true or not. But then again a I7 machine will properly but quite expensive compared to the Microserver.

Do you know if the Microserver is powerful enough to handle Plex streaming to multiple devices? And the SAB stuff. Normally that's what kills of other NAS devices.
My past experience with AMD hasn't been all that great either :)

Looking forward to more ideas. A Microserver looks like a sweet solution - but trying to see all the possiblelities.

Offline Foobar

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2013, 04:11:34 pm »
The 4 bays you see are SAS connected SATA drives, there's also a single on board SATA connector as well as an esata port round the back.  I run my boot SSD off the single SATA, four drives in the bays as well as another large drive situated up on the 5.25 area off the esata with the cable looped back inside, so with very little effort and an extra cable (esata to sata), six drives is easily possible.  I could run a larger boot drive to add more space overall but I prefer to have something fast and low powered, an SSD works brilliantly.

Some run even more drives by adding more SATA ports with a card, there's a few 5.25 mounts that will take between four and six 2.5" drives, but that's going to extremes.

As for what it's capable of running, there's so much info out there on what people have done with these boxes it's probably only a google search away, I'm sure you'll be able to find info on how it handles SAB.  I know plenty run sickbeard and couchpotato so I can't imagine SAB being much more demanding than those.  Some even run them as a full on HTPC with the addition of a better low profile video card.

As for the i7 running only 18W idle, sounds unlikely but maybe it's a low power version, a quick look at the current lineup shows a  3770S i7 rated at 65W, maybe at idle they consume very little but that CPU alone costs 1.5 times what an entire microserver does.

They're not perfect, but definitely worth considering to see if it meets your needs.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 04:13:21 pm by Foobar »

Offline vletroye

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 04:48:50 pm »
I used different Gigabytes MB in the past and still have one in my current Home Server.
I was quite happy with the features of that MB (for the price) although I experienced various issues with them.

Your choice has 6 sata connectors. One will be for the Windows, ins't ? => that's 5 for PPU/DRU

This case can enclose 8 HDD. For so many drives, not sure that the cooling is adequate, especially when I see how there are placed



You are really never going to need mode that 4 DRU x 3TB ? To plug more drives, you will need an additional sata controller. If you want good perf I really recommend you to go for a good one. And not sure that such a card will be compatible with this MB. E.g.: It has been such a mess/hell for me to use my LSI controller on my Gigabyte MB. I had to test many different version of the LSI firmware (Thx a lot to LSI support as they don't support Gigabyte officially). So think long term.

E.g.: In the past, I was using a high tower with 8 disks. Quite enough to store my mp3 and ripped DVD...
To store my HD video, I started next to add 2 "Icy Box" racks in that tower to plug up to 12 drives (I had also to add a controller 4 ports).  Finally, being out of place to store also HO movied, and anyway unable to extend my existing RAID 5 storage, I decided to go for a rack mountable case (a Norco 24 disks) and LSI controllers. I currently only have 16 drives but at least now, with that case and FlexRaid, I feel confortable for at least the 10 coming years :P

Now, regarding power consumption... well... which PSU are you going to use ? It will make the difference.
I also see you want to go for an i7 and 16GB... You plan to use that PC for anything else than streaming ?
It would be a pity to use it only for video streaming, taking the price into account...

To not consume too much power, my home server is not up 24/7. I use WOL and remote shutdown to access it. For 24/7 video streaming and other features (video surveillance, website/blog, photo album, downloads, etc...) I use a Synology (NAS).

Offline Kega

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2013, 07:31:38 am »
The 4 bays you see are SAS connected SATA drives, there's also a single on board SATA connector as well as an esata port round the back.  I run my boot SSD off the single SATA, four drives in the bays as well as another large drive situated up on the 5.25 area off the esata with the cable looped back inside, so with very little effort and an extra cable (esata to sata), six drives is easily possible.  I could run a larger boot drive to add more space overall but I prefer to have something fast and low powered, an SSD works brilliantly.

Some run even more drives by adding more SATA ports with a card, there's a few 5.25 mounts that will take between four and six 2.5" drives, but that's going to extremes.

As for what it's capable of running, there's so much info out there on what people have done with these boxes it's probably only a google search away, I'm sure you'll be able to find info on how it handles SAB.  I know plenty run sickbeard and couchpotato so I can't imagine SAB being much more demanding than those.  Some even run them as a full on HTPC with the addition of a better low profile video card.

As for the i7 running only 18W idle, sounds unlikely but maybe it's a low power version, a quick look at the current lineup shows a  3770S i7 rated at 65W, maybe at idle they consume very little but that CPU alone costs 1.5 times what an entire microserver does.

They're not perfect, but definitely worth considering to see if it meets your needs.

I have to check with my co-worker, how he get his I7 3770K to 18W, because like you say, all test/reviews say something different - but I have no reason to think he is lying :)

But as far as I can see, the Microserver only supports up-to 2TB HDD's (and a max of 8TB total) and has trouble transcoding HD movies (e.g. what Plex does). Also the price dependent on which Mircoserver you pick, the NL40 is a bit cheaper than a I7 3770K - but the newest NL54 is more expensive (although still cheaper than a full I7 machine).   
I still think it looks cool, but just not sold on - as I'm unsure if it can do what I'm aiming for :)


I used different Gigabytes MB in the past and still have one in my current Home Server.
I was quite happy with the features of that MB (for the price) although I experienced various issues with them.

Your choice has 6 sata connectors. One will be for the Windows, ins't ? => that's 5 for PPU/DRU

This case can enclose 8 HDD. For so many drives, not sure that the cooling is adequate, especially when I see how there are placed

You are really never going to need mode that 4 DRU x 3TB ? To plug more drives, you will need an additional sata controller. If you want good perf I really recommend you to go for a good one. And not sure that such a card will be compatible with this MB. E.g.: It has been such a mess/hell for me to use my LSI controller on my Gigabyte MB. I had to test many different version of the LSI firmware (Thx a lot to LSI support as they don't support Gigabyte officially). So think long term.

E.g.: In the past, I was using a high tower with 8 disks. Quite enough to store my mp3 and ripped DVD...
To store my HD video, I started next to add 2 "Icy Box" racks in that tower to plug up to 12 drives (I had also to add a controller 4 ports).  Finally, being out of place to store also HO movied, and anyway unable to extend my existing RAID 5 storage, I decided to go for a rack mountable case (a Norco 24 disks) and LSI controllers. I currently only have 16 drives but at least now, with that case and FlexRaid, I feel confortable for at least the 10 coming years :P

Now, regarding power consumption... well... which PSU are you going to use ? It will make the difference.
I also see you want to go for an i7 and 16GB... You plan to use that PC for anything else than streaming ?
It would be a pity to use it only for video streaming, taking the price into account...

To not consume too much power, my home server is not up 24/7. I use WOL and remote shutdown to access it. For 24/7 video streaming and other features (video surveillance, website/blog, photo album, downloads, etc...) I use a Synology (NAS).

Yeah, my mistake that's true - 1 HDD for the OS, so 5 spaces left. :)

Another case you would recommend instead?
Also if you have had problems with Gigabit, is there another Motherboard you would pick? Gigabit has served me well in my last PC, but I have no problem choosing a different brand if they are better ;)
For me the Motherboard, PSU and also somewhat cases is an insane maze to figure out.

I'm just a bit unsure what your asking, if I really need more that 4x3TB or if 4x3TB is anywhere near enough?
As of right now I think 3xDRUx3TB will keep me going for a long while, but I like the option to expand if needed.

Additional sata controller is hopefully a long way into the future, but what is good - I have absolutely no clue about that, have never in my life needed it before.

I'm sorry, this might be a stupid question - but a Norco 24 disks rack isn't that a bit overkill?? :) And isn't that just HDD space, it can't do much other than that - or is that incorrect?
So your home server is the Norco or do you have a separate machine for that?
To me it sounds like I will have my "normal" work/gaming machine and then add a HDD rack, a NAS (Qnap or Synology) and finally a machine to transcode for Plex. That sounds like a really expensive and space consuming setup or is the setup totally wrong?
If you buy a Norco, do you need anything else than a bunch of HDD's to get it running? And if I like to use Flexraid with my HDD rack - can that be done? Can you install windows on a machine like that? I'm a horrible Linux user, everything will take forever to figure out :)
Plus it looks like it's impossible to get Norco products in Denmark :(
And as far as I know the Qnap or Synology machines aren't powerful enough to handle SAB - unless you buy some that are quite expensive.


The PSU I'm not a 100% sure on yet.
My idea right now is only streaming, but as far as I know Plex needs a pretty heavy machine to transcode - depending on how many users their are. But I might use it for more things in the future.


I would like to thank you for your answers - hope to get even more. I thought I had a good setup, but now I'm more unsure of what to buy than ever before :)
« Last Edit: February 09, 2013, 07:43:31 am by Kega »

Offline Foobar

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2013, 02:03:00 pm »
It takes bigger drives than 2TB, I have 5x 4TB in mine no issues at all.  It also officially only supports 8GB ECC ram max but many people including myself are running 16GB non ECC without issue, just have to be sure to buy a brand and model that someone else has tested.  In my case, it's 2x Transcend JM1333KLH-8G.

The N54L does have a bit extra grunt but does cost a little more yes.  They're fantastic little boxes that can do a lot but obviously have limitations.

Offline vletroye

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2013, 03:02:49 pm »
I bought my home server case from XCase (UK), delivered to Belgium after a small journey in your contry :D

I order two cases (one for a friend) and they have been delivered by UPS. Here is the "trip" reported by the tracking ID :  UK => Germany => Denmark => Finland => Denmark => Germany => France (Paris, Nice, Lyon, Paris) => and… one arrived while the other one went to Brussels where it stayed for two days (in “error”) before being finally delivered :D


I suggest you to watch the XCASE's Video as it will answer most of your questions : http://www.xcase.co.uk/X-Case-RM-420-Hotswap-4u-p/case-rm420.htm

The X-CASE-RM-420 is equivalent to the Norco RPC-4224 (IMO it's the very same renamed). I use that name as it's usually well known.

Briefly said my server in built with:
- that case
- an old motherboard previously used in my workstation with a core 2 Quad Q6700 and 4GB Ram.
  When FlexRAID is computing parity
    - CPU in between 50% and 95% , meaning that IO is not a bottleneck as usually.
    - 3GB RAM and more are used, meaning that PC could be slow downed by paging.
  I have not yet streamed video from that machine but to my knowledge there should really be not issue
- 2 onboard sata ports to build a RAID 0 with 2 old HDD 10.000 RPM for the OS: Windows 2012 Essentials
- one LSI controller able to support 16 HDD. Great performance !
- two onboard ethernet ports configured to do NIC Teaming (load balancing)
- a 800W PSU. Choose a good one that is able to support many drives spinning all together. You can easily find online tools to size your PSU like this one http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/
- a small UPS

Why a large case. Because twice in the past I have been really in trouble to add storage in my pervious cases.

Why not a higher CPU/MB/RAM ? Because I didn't want to spent money on a "simple" storage server. Instead, I decided to invest for a new workstation (I7, 16GB, Asus P9X79, RAID 0 of SSD) and to reuse the current hardware of my workstation to build the storage server.


Conclusion:
- the most powerful PC at home is my workstation (a bit for gaming, a lot for development).
- the only 24/7 device at home is my NAS (Synology).
- and my storage server is a middle class CPU with very high storage capacity, turned on only for backups/transfer or during a few hours for other purpose => no real concern regarding power consumption. Anyway, I didn't feel expert enough to build a stable server with really many disks and still a low consumption.
 

I never used SAB, but I known you can install SABnzbd on a Synology. That being said, the Download Station of Synology is quite great... No need for an alternative as far as I am concerned. It supports torrent and http download.
You can also record TV directly on the NAS with a USB receiver (see list of supported device on Synology website) and the Movie Station of Synology really does a great job at downloading metadata for the movies...

The very best compromise between a QNAP/Synology NAS and a Home Server Case is indeed the HP Proliant IMO.

Offline Kega

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2013, 04:52:22 am »
It takes bigger drives than 2TB, I have 5x 4TB in mine no issues at all.  It also officially only supports 8GB ECC ram max but many people including myself are running 16GB non ECC without issue, just have to be sure to buy a brand and model that someone else has tested.  In my case, it's 2x Transcend JM1333KLH-8G.

The N54L does have a bit extra grunt but does cost a little more yes.  They're fantastic little boxes that can do a lot but obviously have limitations.

I will definitely agree with you that is a great machine and didn't I what to use Plex, I would properly have thrown money at the screen to get one as fast as possible.

I suggest you to watch the XCASE's Video as it will answer most of your questions : http://www.xcase.co.uk/X-Case-RM-420-Hotswap-4u-p/case-rm420.htm

The X-CASE-RM-420 is equivalent to the Norco RPC-4224 (IMO it's the very same renamed). I use that name as it's usually well known.

Briefly said my server in built with:
- that case
- an old motherboard previously used in my workstation with a core 2 Quad Q6700 and 4GB Ram.
  When FlexRAID is computing parity
    - CPU in between 50% and 95% , meaning that IO is not a bottleneck as usually.
    - 3GB RAM and more are used, meaning that PC could be slow downed by paging.
  I have not yet streamed video from that machine but to my knowledge there should really be not issue
- 2 onboard sata ports to build a RAID 0 with 2 old HDD 10.000 RPM for the OS: Windows 2012 Essentials
- one LSI controller able to support 16 HDD. Great performance !
- two onboard ethernet ports configured to do NIC Teaming (load balancing)
- a 800W PSU. Choose a good one that is able to support many drives spinning all together. You can easily find online tools to size your PSU like this one http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/
- a small UPS

Why a large case. Because twice in the past I have been really in trouble to add storage in my pervious cases.

Why not a higher CPU/MB/RAM ? Because I didn't want to spent money on a "simple" storage server. Instead, I decided to invest for a new workstation (I7, 16GB, Asus P9X79, RAID 0 of SSD) and to reuse the current hardware of my workstation to build the storage server.


Conclusion:
- the most powerful PC at home is my workstation (a bit for gaming, a lot for development).
- the only 24/7 device at home is my NAS (Synology).
- and my storage server is a middle class CPU with very high storage capacity, turned on only for backups/transfer or during a few hours for other purpose => no real concern regarding power consumption. Anyway, I didn't feel expert enough to build a stable server with really many disks and still a low consumption.
 

I never used SAB, but I known you can install SABnzbd on a Synology. That being said, the Download Station of Synology is quite great... No need for an alternative as far as I am concerned. It supports torrent and http download.
You can also record TV directly on the NAS with a USB receiver (see list of supported device on Synology website) and the Movie Station of Synology really does a great job at downloading metadata for the movies...

The very best compromise between a QNAP/Synology NAS and a Home Server Case is indeed the HP Proliant IMO.

To be honest, after seeing the video I really wanted one of those cases :)
But it sounds really expensive. The case is more than a Microserver and a LSI for 16 HDD is almost 3-4 times that amount or am I looking at the wrong LSI controllers (9260, 9280 & 9750). Meaning I could properly get 4-6 HP Microservers for the price of this setup. Just out of curiosity how many PPU do you have, when using 16 HDD?
To me this would be the dream case, but it sounds like I would still end up as my current setup (Your hardware sounds just like mine). A machine that I have to turn on and off all the time, and that would still draw heavy on the electric bill.
I'm I totally off here?

« Last Edit: February 10, 2013, 07:07:10 am by Kega »

Offline b-earl

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2013, 07:39:50 am »
Hi

If you use a motherboard with enough PCIe 8 slots I would use the IBM M1015 aka LSI 9210/9211 is cheaper and with three you can use all 24 bays. You can see my system in the screenshots on www.flexraid.com I have my drives in an  Chenbro 41416. Now I changed the motherboard to a Supermicro with Intel i3 The Sabertooth went in to my Desktop. But I think a 550 to 650 Watt PSU is enough. My Server at boot goes up to 230 Watt but during use is at about 130 Watt.
Server HW: Chenbro RM41416 case | Supermicro X11SCZ-F + LSI SAS 9305-16i | i3-8300 | 16 GB DDR4 ECC Ram
Server OS:   Windows Server 2016 (UEFI) on  250 GB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 ssd
tRAID 1.1.0 2017.02.11
Backupserver: Supermicro X10SLM-F UEFI + LSI SAS9211-8i IT FW
Server OS: Win 2016 + tRAID

Offline vletroye

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2013, 11:19:55 am »
> I'm I totally off here?

No, you are right... But this was the "long" term solution I decided to built when I planned the growing of my storage...

Also, if I count how many € I spent to extend my old server from 8 to 12 disks (with 2 "Icy Box", that I finally replaced with 2 larger "Icy Dock", buying one additional "small" 4 port controller -  Promise FastTrak TX4660), that was throwing money by the window as at the end, I was stuck again.. On the other side, I was young when I built this old server and couldn't afford a large case with the required controller a that time.

Biggest advantage of FlexRAID => you may easily replace disks with larger ones... So a case like owned by b-earl could possibly fit your needs. In the coming years you will maybe be able to replace 3TB disks with (??? who knows) 5TB disks when you will be out of space... I never considered that option when I bought my case as it is not possibly for me (to my knowledge) to replace disks with larger ones in a hardware RAID 5 array .

Offline b-earl

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2013, 12:30:37 pm »
Quote
...not possibly for me (to my knowledge) to replace disks with larger ones in a hardware RAID 5 array.

Thats why I was so happy to find flexraid. I never forget as I had my old Adaptec 8port Raidcontroller and had to switch from 5 250 GB drives to 1 TB. It was a pain in the ass to change the disks or enlarge a raid array.

With flexraid it has become much easier.
Server HW: Chenbro RM41416 case | Supermicro X11SCZ-F + LSI SAS 9305-16i | i3-8300 | 16 GB DDR4 ECC Ram
Server OS:   Windows Server 2016 (UEFI) on  250 GB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 ssd
tRAID 1.1.0 2017.02.11
Backupserver: Supermicro X10SLM-F UEFI + LSI SAS9211-8i IT FW
Server OS: Win 2016 + tRAID

Offline Kega

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Re: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2013, 11:17:16 am »
First thing, sorry for the long time to reply. Life has been a bit hectic.

Hi

If you use a motherboard with enough PCIe 8 slots I would use the IBM M1015 aka LSI 9210/9211 is cheaper and with three you can use all 24 bays. You can see my system in the screenshots on www.flexraid.com I have my drives in an  Chenbro 41416. Now I changed the motherboard to a Supermicro with Intel i3 The Sabertooth went in to my Desktop. But I think a 550 to 650 Watt PSU is enough. My Server at boot goes up to 230 Watt but during use is at about 130 Watt.

My wallet is screaming a bit, when it sees the prices on LSI cards. And as of this moment I don't think I really need them, and the Chenbro case doesn't look easy to buy or cheap for that matter - at least where I'm located. I think I have to find a starting place. Buying a good motherboard that I can move to a rack case if needed.
Starting with a case that cost me more than 600USD seems a bit overkill to me :)
I can always scale up, if I have the correct hardware - or am I mistaken?
Right now I'm looking at 3x3TB DRU and 1x3TB PPU disk, which should give me around 9 TB to start with. Can I ask how many of your 16 disks are PPU's?
I have never heard of Supermicro before, so no clue if that's the best motherboard to buy - I just can't find the version you have in my country and the Supermicro's I can find is 3 times more expensive than the Gigabyte :)

Also 130watts sound like a lot, until I thought of 16 HDD running.

> I'm I totally off here?

No, you are right... But this was the "long" term solution I decided to built when I planned the growing of my storage...

Also, if I count how many € I spent to extend my old server from 8 to 12 disks (with 2 "Icy Box", that I finally replaced with 2 larger "Icy Dock", buying one additional "small" 4 port controller -  Promise FastTrak TX4660), that was throwing money by the window as at the end, I was stuck again.. On the other side, I was young when I built this old server and couldn't afford a large case with the required controller a that time.

Biggest advantage of FlexRAID => you may easily replace disks with larger ones... So a case like owned by b-earl could possibly fit your needs. In the coming years you will maybe be able to replace 3TB disks with (??? who knows) 5TB disks when you will be out of space... I never considered that option when I bought my case as it is not possibly for me (to my knowledge) to replace disks with larger ones in a hardware RAID 5 array .

But it sounds like your using your server to more than just streaming and fun stuff. To me, as of this moment, it sounds really expensive to buy a case that cost the same amount as the hardware for a good/decent pc. Would it be silly to buy a smaller and cheaper case to begin with. I'm only using 5 disks - 4 like mentioned above, and 1 for OS. And then slowly move forward if needed?
You talk about the Gigabyte motherboard could be a problem in the long run if I will use LSI products, any idea what I should throw my money after instead?

Thanks for all your help, it has open my eyes for more possibilities :)

P.S. Talked to my co-worker about his 18watts I7 machine. He had a watt-meter to it and it said 18 watts when idle. The only stuff he has in it is:
I7 3770K
Motherboard
16GB of ram
SDD with Windows 7
PSU

And nothing else. If his daughter uses it for playing games on, it will take about 80watts - or in that area.

If my math is correct I should add another 5watts for each WD Red HDD I put into the machine. I'm guessing streaming a movie to XBMC should take almost no CPU power, or am I wrong?

Sorry for any spelling mistakes.

Offline b-earl

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Sv: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #13 on: February 16, 2013, 04:08:23 pm »
Hi kega,
Of course the market in the country your are living decides theorize and the availability. I nought my chenbro case over eBay from Germany. Shipping to Austria. Costs about 350 €. If I would buy a new one then it would be from x case in the UK, they are cheaper. The mainboard was because I wanted s server board, but I think it cost about 150 €, and se sabertooth wasn't much cheaper.
The ibm sata card is often cheaper over eBay then the original LSI.

At the moment there are only 12 drives in myserver, of them 1 is the system drive and another the download drive. The rest os divided into 4 DRUs and one ppu. The ppu consisting of one 3 tb drive.

I have used 2 ASUS mainboards for AMD CPU work just fine with two LSI controllers.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 09:17:41 am by b-earl »
Server HW: Chenbro RM41416 case | Supermicro X11SCZ-F + LSI SAS 9305-16i | i3-8300 | 16 GB DDR4 ECC Ram
Server OS:   Windows Server 2016 (UEFI) on  250 GB Samsung 970 Evo M.2 ssd
tRAID 1.1.0 2017.02.11
Backupserver: Supermicro X10SLM-F UEFI + LSI SAS9211-8i IT FW
Server OS: Win 2016 + tRAID

Offline Kega

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Re: Sv: Buying my first DIY NAS
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2013, 03:55:30 pm »
Hi keys,
Of course the market in the country your are living decides theorize and the availability. I nought my chenbro case over eBay from Germany. Shipping to Austria. Costs about 350 €. If I would buy a new one then it would be from x case in the UK, they are cheaper. The mainboard was because I wanted s server board, but I think it cost about 150 €, and se sabertooth wasn't much cheaper.
The ibm sata card is often cheaper over eBay then the original LSI.

At the moment there are only 12 drives in myserver, of them 1 is the system drive and another the download drive. The rest os divided into 4 DRUs and one ppu. The ppu consisting of one 3 tb drive.

I have used 2 ASUS mainboards for AMD CPU work just fine with two LSI controllers.

I'm sorry, hope this isn't annoying - but I'm really green with all this.

Getting a Xcase would be awesome, but RM420 will be 350€ for me - that is a lot of money for a case. A case I'm not sure I will ever fill out. And if I would - it will properly be a while before it happens.
So my idea right now is scaling down on the case - buy what I need right now.  Don't know if that's silly, but this is a "simple" home media server.
In some months if I see the need for a larger case I would properly go for the xcase - so my hardware purchase should most definitely work with an xcase and LSI card.
If I get the Xcase RM420 I was thinking of using a 3Ware PTP-SFF8087 cable to begin with. Then expand with a LSI SAS 9201-16i instead of two 9211-8i. That way I should be able to use all 20 HDD slots and then "just" normal sata cables for the internal drives. Does that make sense? If it does, is that a good idea?

You say you bought a Asus Sabertooth motherboard, if I may ask - why? Would it be stupid to buy a cheaper Asus board with only one PCI-E slot? Or would a server motherboard be a better solution? In that case which one and why? Sorry I'm pretty blank on this subject.

Would this COOLER MASTER case work as a starting case or would it be a horrible solution?

What about PSU, how much different does 80+ bronze, silver, gold and platinum do? Seasonic SS-860XP 80+ PLATINUM 860W (for some reason newegg only finds a 660W where in Denmark I get a 860W version). Would that be best or is that overkill for a server?

It all just becomes really expensive. With the Xcase, LSI and PSU. That will be significantly more than I budget for the whole NAS/server machine.