Author Topic: What is the largest size pool of drives I can make with FlexRAID in Windows 7?  (Read 2475 times)

Offline ethanwa

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I need to have a large pool with parity.... like a 70TB drive basically. I'm backing up all of my Blu-ray movies to ISO and it's going to take massive space.

What's the largest pool I can have with FlexRAID in Windows 7? What are your recommendations for parity drives for a setup like this? Initially I'll be starting with 3TB drives but upgrade them to 4TB as time goes on the prices fall.

Also, from what I understand, I can just add new drives as needed, correct? What if I want to replace a drive with a larger one... what is the process to do that?

Thanks,

Ethan

Offline naeonline

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What's the largest pool I can have with FlexRAID in Windows 7?
That is an excellent question about the pool size.  Brahim will have to comment here since he's the one that implemented the pool as an NTFS drive, but the NTFS limitations are as follows:
  • The NTFS design has a limitation of 16EB (an EB is about 1 million TBs) for a volume size and also for a file size.
  • The NTFS implemented in the Windows driver has a limitation of 226TB for a volume size and 16TB for a file size.
So as far as an NTFS file system is concerned, you're covered.  Like I stated though, Brahim will have to fill us in on this.

What are your recommendations for parity drives for a setup like this?
A lot of different ways this can go depending on your preferences.  If you don't want to have to reconfigure your PPUs (E.G. swap which drives are PPUs and copy parity data or rebuild parity data), buy some 4TB drives now to start out with them as your PPUs otherwise start with 3TB PPUs.  This will make it so your 4TB data drives you purchase later will fit in nicely.  Now how many PPUs should you have?  Lets say you start out with 60TB consisting of 20 3TB drives.  If you store your Blu-Ray rips as ISOs, they take up ~50GB; as folders you'll average ~30GB and possibly more as studios fit more onto the discs.  This leaves you with between 60 and 100 movies per 3TB drive.  With 1 PPU you can recover from 1 drive failure...so for 20 drives if more than one fails, you'd have to re-rip 60-100 movies per drive that fails in addition to the first failed drive.  I would recommend at least 2 PPUs to start with and as more drives get added add PPUs as you feel comfortable with the growth of your storage.  Don't buy all your drives from one vendor either.

Also, from what I understand, I can just add new drives as needed, correct?
Yes, that is correct.

What if I want to replace a drive with a larger one... what is the process to do that?
1) Copy contents of old drive to new drive
2) Remove old drive from DRU
3) Add new drive to same DRU
Note: I left this generic because it may or may not be slightly different depending on if you are using expert mode or cruise control mode.

Offline ethanwa

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Quote
1) Copy contents of old drive to new drive
2) Remove old drive from DRU
3) Add new drive to same DRU
Note: I left this generic because it may or may not be slightly different depending on if you are using expert mode or cruise control mode.

As far as I have read, all drives will be pooled to be a single drive letter. So how can I know which files are on which disk? Looking for a bit more explained here. Thanks for your other answers, they are great!

Offline Brahim

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@ethanwa
The pool can grow to up to 16 million terabytes. :)


Offline bold

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As far as I have read, all drives will be pooled to be a single drive letter. So how can I know which files are on which disk? Looking for a bit more explained here. Thanks for your other answers, they are great!

Try the program Where is it. See the http://www.whereisit-soft.com/. It's been around for a very long time and is very nifty and fast for cataloguing disks and drives. Searching across drives is very fast.